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Archives by Tag 'Zone Defense'




Key Rules and Coaching Points for Effective 1-3-1 Zone Defense

By adam.warner - Last updated: Wednesday, May 2, 2012

This week’s defensive concepts feature focuses on key rules and guidelines for effective 1-3-1 zone defense. With Adams Friendship (WI) High School head coach Steve Klaas leading the way, you’ll learn about essentials when it comes to zone defense personnel, player positioning, defensive implementation, and overall philosophy.

Essential 1-3-1 Coaching Points

In basketball, something happens when everyone knows exactly where they’re supposed to be at all times. For Coach  Klaas, his steams have had success in the past because they always know where to be. Let’s begin by revealing how the defense is numbered in order to keep it simple.

Player 1 is our best athlete. He is taller and has long arms. We want him in a position to cover the entire floor. Next, the 2 and 3 players serve as the wing personnel. Player 2 is on ballside and usually smaller, quicker, and loves to pressure the ball. Our weakside wing is bigger and a better rebounder. Next, Player 5 is our strongest player and plays between the ball and the basket, where we need strength. Finally, Player 4 is our baseline runner and does just that, sprinting from corner to corner.

 

Rules of the 1-3-1 Zone Defense

1) Every player must stay in a stance for the entire defensive possession. In this simulation, the offense starts throwing the ball around. Keep watching to see if the squad can stay in a defensive stance the entire time. This is something your team should work at, push, and strive for.

2) Read the eyes of the passer. This is similar to what any good defensive back would do. And because we are reading the eyes of the offense 3) We will move while the ball is in the air. We don’t rest on defense. Check out the game footage of Adams Friendship to see just how active the team is on the defensive end of the floor.

4) Look to deflect. To help with this, turn your thumb down so you can control the deflection. Keep in mind, the person who deflects the ball is often not the one who steals it. Instead, we expect someone else to pick it up. Therefore, mirror the ball. The ball should always be pressured.

5) Everyone goes to the boards mad. When the ball is shot, everyone knows where they are supposed to be. Note: Player 1 never blocks out. He goes immediately to the weakside board. In fact, because of this tactic, he might just end up being your squad’s leading rebounder.

 

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “Dominating 1-3-1 Zone Defense.” To check out more videos featuring defensive drills and systems, simply head over to our basketball library




New Lacrosse DVD featuring Scott Tucker!

By nate.landas - Last updated: Friday, March 2, 2012

We have recently released two Lacrosse DVDs featuring Scott Tucker.  He is the Limestone College Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach and Synapse Sports National Coach of the Year.  The names of these two new Lacrosse DVDs are:

The 33 Zone Ride

  • Force more turn overs and keep the ball on your offensive end
  • Give up fewer goals off of fast breaks
  • Control the tempo of the game
  • The Backer Zone Defense

  • Force your opponent to change their offensive game plan
  • Use The Backer Zone Defense to split the field in half to put more pressure on the ball
  • Discover how cutting off the adjacent pass can slow down ball movement
  • Use The Backer Zone Defense in man up or man down situations
  • See how to rotate and cover to better defend the middle cuts
  • Buy the Scott Tucker Defense 2-Pack and save $10!

    Scott Tucker Defense 2-Pack

     




    Key Tips and Drills for Attacking Zone Offenses

    By adam.warner - Last updated: Wednesday, January 25, 2012

    With Rutgers University head men’s basketball coach Mike Rice as your guide, learn how to maximize your zone offense efficiency and train your players how to become instinctive to attacking zone defenses. The goal here is that after mastering these drills, your players should become better players against zone. Plus, they’ll be able to read defenses better and react to them, making them complete players for any system.

    4 on 3 Passing

    Efficient passing is a necessity when it comes to attacking the zone. As a team, you want to attack the paint, collapse the defense, and then finish the play from there. While this is a great passing drill for anything really, it is especially helpful for reading the defense. For coach Rice, if Rutgers is about to play a zone team, this is the drill that the squad starts out practice with. It gets players to keep their heads up, make ball fakes, play low, and understand who is open.

    Four players start out on the blocks and elbows and three other players begin in the middle of the paint. One defender is closing out to the ball, and the other two players play how they want but must get in the passing lanes. The only rule is that the defense has to play the ball and be active. Coach Rice often implements the rule that after eight passes, if the defense deflects the ball, they put a point on the board.

     

    Gap Shooting

    Start with three lines of players around the arc. The drill begins with a pass to an adjacent player, he makes a shot fake or ball fake, and then immediately gets into a gap. Coach Rice will often use coaches or even chairs so that players can effectively get into the gaps.

    Next, players will kick out the ball to an adjacent player. From there, players can either fade and pivot or go behind their teammate from there. Once the ball gets to that third player, he/she will shoot it. A coach will also have a ball on the side and will pass to the middle player for a shot. The only person that doesn’t get a shot here is the player who started the drill.

    Tips for Zone Offense: Don’t be lined up exactly where the defense lines up. Remember, a possession in basketball comes down to whether your guys can make better decisions than the opposing players. You do this through drills so it eventually becomes instinctive.

    The drill eventually moves into “Next Pass Shooting.” Any of the three offensive players can start out the drill this time. But this time, there’s only one penetration, then a shot fake, a next pass, another pass, and shot. According to Coach Rice, sometimes we over-penetrate, so we need to practice making the drive and short kick.

     

    The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “Mike Rice: Zone Offense and Zone Concepts.” To check out more videos focusing on zone basketball, simply head over to our basketball library.




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