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Archives by Tag 'Lars Tiffany'

Rotate Correctly within a Man-Down Defense!

By Kevin Fitzpatrick - Last updated: Tuesday, May 10, 2016

A fundamental aspect of running a successful man-down defense is being able to rotate correctly. Lars Tiffany, Brown University head men’s coach and two-time Ivy League Champion, shows you a drill that gets a coach in the middle of the action as players work on being two passes away.

Coach in the Middle

Drill Summary: Set up with an offense in a 1-3-2 set around the goal, with a coach standing as the middle of that set. Next, add a five-man defense. As the offense passes a ball around the perimeter of their formation, the defense must jump to the correct position on every pass. Someone should always be guarding the ball, two people should always be one pass away and two people should always be two passes away. The defenders who are two passes away must touch the coach to let the coach know they’re in the correct position.

This video came from Championship Productions’ video “Basic & Advanced Man Down Defense.” Browse other world class Lacrosse videos at ChampionshipProductions.com!

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Disrupt Passing Lanes with a Knockdown Drill!

By Kevin Fitzpatrick - Last updated: Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Lars Tiffany, Brown University head men’s lacrosse coach and two time Ivy League champion, shows you a drill that will help defensemen knock down more passes in front of the goal. Coach Tiffany’s exercise forces defensemen to jump to the ball and recover as they attempt to disrupt passing lanes.

3 vs. 1 Knockdown Drill

Drill Summary: Set up in a triangle formation with an offensive player about 15 yards in front of the net, another about 10 yards toward the sideline from the first player, and one just in front of the goal on the same side. Meanwhile, a defensive player steps into the skip lane between the first and third offensive player. Offensive players pass a ball between each other while the defenseman jumps to each pass. The goal is for the defensive player to knock down passes. Make sure offensive players take some chances to work on game-like situations for the defenseman.

Keys to the Drill:

1) Quick passes.
2) Defenseman jumps to the ball.
3) Use the stick to intercept and deflect balls.
4) Stay in a good stance.

This video came from Championship Productions’ video “Basic & Advanced Man Down Defense.” Browse other world class Lacrosse videos at ChampionshipProductions.com!

Interested in receiving a FREE lacrosse newsletter? Sign up today to get tips, technique and drills similar to the post above!




Slide Schemes: Effective Drills & Concepts to Improve Team Defense

By adam.warner - Last updated: Tuesday, April 17, 2012

In this week’s team development feature, we’ll focus on defensive slide schemes in a 4 v 4 format. Be sure to pick up critical tips, strategies, and effective practice drills from one of the game’s brightest minds. Brown head men’s lacrosse coach Lars Tiffany first breaks down the action using whiteboard diagrams before moving to the field for live simulations.

The action starts with 4 v 4 dodging and then moves into top down slide schemes. Also, read about more defensive practice drills and key strategies by checking out previous features featuring Coach Tiffany.

4 v 4 Dodging — Overview

This 4 v 4 drill, zeroing in on perimeter rotation, is highly effective for building on team defensive concepts and practicing game-like situations. Start by putting four offensive players in box positions on the outside (two behind attackers and two middies up top). Then put four defenders on the field as well, each covering an offensive player. Coach Tiffany prefers to start by coming out of the low right corner for this drill. You can also change where you do the initial dodge to practice a number of different looks.

 

Key Concepts & Drill Strategies

In terms of player roles, “D0” means the on-ball defender. Because there is no crease in play with this set-up, we must slide adjacent. Here we can practice our adjacent slide schemes versus a perimeter four-man set up.

D1 is the hot man and must be ready to slide cross crease. D2 is ready to be the second slide, or our fill. D3 could also be ready to be the third slide. If your unit does a good job on the on-ball defender and forces the attacker to the outside or inside roll and doesn’t beat you top side, then D1 comes cross crease. If the offense makes the open pass to the opposite open attacker, D2 comes down the backside with the second slide and then D3 arrives with the third slide across. Meanwhile, our recovery man (the former on-ball defender) comes back and finds the open man, which in this case is the middie up top.

Goals: You can get a ton of reps with this drill. All players should rotate through the positions as well (from D0 to D3). This way, defenders must recognize their new roles and make the proper adjustments.

4 v 4 Top Down Slide Schemes

This particular slide scheme simulates when the second slide comes from the top down. The drill demonstrates when there are three middies up top offensively, a set-up teams are using more frequently in recent years. There’s also one crease player and likely two players behind the goal with this formation.

In this simulation, the dodge is coming from the top left middie, and “D0” will be the on-ball defender. Also, get a line of players just off to the side and ready to step up after each rep.

Key Strategies: “D1” is our hot player and covering the crease player in the middle. Now, we have a choice as to who’s going to be that second slide. Let’s identify “D2” now for the second slide on the backside wing. When D1 moves up with his slide, D2 will then slide down the backside to cover the crease man and “fill down.” Now the offense won’t have an open crease player because we slid properly and have it covered. Then it all comes down to how quickly the offense can move the ball around against how quickly the defense can recover and defend against it. There is a big chance for a 2-on-1 offensive break, so communication is key for the defense.

 

Goals: You can have them go at 100 percent and smash each other OR go at 75 percent and have the dodger dodge and force the defense to slide, and then the dodger resets and goes again. Make this simulation realistic where the defense must slide, recover, and then slide again quickly.

 

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “How to Create a Strong Team Defense” with Lars Tiffany. To check out more defensive-oriented videos, head over to our lacrosse library




Effective Man Down Defense: 5-on-3 Tactics and Drills

By adam.warner - Last updated: Tuesday, January 10, 2012

This week’s team development feature focuses on man-down defense and a key drill that can help boost your team’s overall defensive play. Led by Brown University head men’s lacrosse coach Lars Tiffany, the drill featured in this segment will teach your defenders how to knock down crucial passes in 5 v 3 situations and get them to learn proper positioning in specific man-down formats. This 5 on 3 drill — easy to implement at practice — will also have players going at full speed.

Man-Down Defense: 5 on 3 “Chalk Talk”

For this scenario, A, B, C, D, and E are all offensive players. For defense, we have D1, D2, and D3. With this drill, the defense has more opportunities to see the ball flying around from different angles. The offense will be set up in an outside formation of a 3-3 offensive set. Meanwhile, the defenders will be put in the skip lanes, the primary lanes you need to knock down passes. Coach Tiffany has excluded the two defenders who might be responsible for defending the crease.

With this drill, if the ball is with B, we need D1 and D3 to be responsible for the skip lanes, i.e. from B to E, and B to D. As the ball moves around the outside, we must define what the next stick lane will be. If the ball is passed from B to C, D1 must adjust his positioning to be in the skip lane from C to E. He must also peek to see if E is moving. If E cuts in, he must cut down further. We tell the top defender (D2 here) that he can’t let a skip go between C and A.

This is an ideal drill to do a day before a game when you’re trying to get the stick skills flowing and don’t want to wear out your players’ legs. Be sure to get a lot of balls behind each offensive player. We want the players to throw a lot of passes, taking a lot of chances, and giving our defense lots of reps to intercept balls, knock them down, and put them on the ground.

 

Man-Down Defense: On the Field

Now we are really building up the picture to be more like a man down scheme against a 3-3 offensive set. We have five offensive players around the horn and have also eliminated the crease player. Remember, the defenders are three perimeter defenders and not the two crease-guarding defenders. The offensive players should remain relatively stationary (i.e. no dodging or attacking the goal).

 

Be sure to pick up some additional man-down drills by reading our previous blog features starring Coach Tiffany: 3 Effective Man-Down Lacrosse Drills to Boost Defensive Play, plus Man-Down Defense: The General Drill.

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “Man-Down Defense: A Catalog of Drills.” To check out more defensive lacrosse videos, visit our lacrosse library.




Building a Strong Team Defense: 2 vs. 2 Drills and Tactics

By adam.warner - Last updated: Tuesday, December 13, 2011

As a former two-time captain and starter on defense under Dom Starsia, current Brown head coach Lars Tiffany has a fundamental understanding of what it takes to be proficient on defense as a unit.

This week, pick up some tips from one of the game’s sharpest minds as Tiffany highlights key defensive strategies in a 2 vs. 2 format. Tiffany first breaks down the 2 vs. 2 action using whiteboard diagrams before taking to the field for some live simulations with his squad.

The action focuses first on using no picks before eventually getting into screens up top and behind the net. Also, be sure to pick up more defensive tips and key terms from our previous feature starring Coach Tiffany.

2 vs. 2 Without Picks

We are adding to our team defense scheme development with 2 vs. 2 action, which really emphasizes on ball and off ball skills. This is more free-flowing than most other defensive drills. With the up top offensive player, we will say to them, can you beat your opponent? For the defensive player, we will say, can you prevent your opponent from beating you? For the two off ball players, can the offensive player rotate to a good spot to be an outlet and a scoring threat? Defensively, do we need the defender to slide? Should you slide?

In this first scenario, we’ve got a dodger up top and an attackman on the crease. But we will also put the offensive players behind the goal, too. Perhaps there’s a defender on-ball and then another defender ready to slide from an adjacent position.

 

On the Field

We do a lot of 2 vs. 2 work at Brown. Let’s start with an on-ball defender and a help defender (hot man). Defensively, do we need to slide? If so, can we do so in a way that won’t leave his man wide open? For now, there will be no picks on the ball.

On the field, players go 2 vs. 2 in live action. Meanwhile, Tiffany provides the play-by-play and uses slow motion replays to highlight his tips and suggestions.

Next, the players move behind the cage. Still, there are no picks yet. The key here is to really emphasize communication between teammates, plus slides and recovery tactics.

2 vs. 2 With Picks

Now, what happens if the offense brings a body to the dodger with a pick? There are three ways to counter.

1) Get Through. Our communicator is the defender off ball (D2). As the attackman approaches the pick, the defender says “Get Through” and he wants to be a yard or two off his man and a yard or so over, giving room for D1 to get underneath the pick and through it.

2) Switch. D1 is on the ball. D2 should position himself a little wide and off his man. D1 will let go of the man he was guarding, releasing him, and switching to guard the picker. D2 will now step up and guard the dodger.

3) Double. This is where we jump the pick. D2 will trail his man in initially. As the pick is set, he will jump up and attack the ball carrier. D1 will trail the dodger into D2, hopefully forming a closing-in tactic on the offensive player.

 

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “How to Create a Strong Team Defense” with Lars Tiffany. Check out similar defensive videos in our exclusive video library.




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