Championship Productions Blog

Archives by Tag 'Freestyle'

Anticipate the Wall to Make a Faster Turn!

By Kevin Fitzpatrick - Last updated: Friday, April 1, 2016

Dr. Sam Freas, Oklahoma Baptist University head coach, helped his team win the 2014 NAIA men’s and women’s swimming & diving National Championship. In this clip, Coach Freas explains what swimmers need to do in order to accelerate off the wall faster on a freestyle turn.

Freestyle Turn

Drill Summary: Coach Freas wants his swimmers to “bounce” off the wall. To do this, swimmers must drive their feet and push BEFORE their feet hit the wall. This means that athletes will be pushing their feet as they’re flipping. Once the feet make contact with the wall, accelerate back into the stroke.

This video came from Championship Productions’ video “All Access Swimming Practice with Sam Freas.” Browse through other Swimming & Diving videos online at ChampionshipProductions.com!

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Tow Swimmers to Speed Up Their Freestyle Stroke!

By Kevin Fitzpatrick - Last updated: Friday, April 1, 2016

University of Tennessee assistant coach and 2000 U.S. Olympic Team assistant coach, Bill Boomer, shows you a drill that’ll tighten up swimmers’ freestyle streamlines. Coach Boomer is a pioneer of balanced swimming (using core muscles to minimize water resistance) with more than 50 years of coaching experience.

Towed Freestyle

Drill Summary: Before beginning, attach a tow cable to the swimmer’s waist. The swimmer pushes off from the wall and is pulled by the tow cable through the water. Start with a one hand lead (either hand) in freestyle restart position. Next, take a swinging recovery and go to the other side with the other arm in the lead. Breathe off the rotation of the body. If the swimmer does the drill correctly, the flow of the water around them should not change.

This video came from Championship Productions’ video “Freestyle Reimagined.” Browse through other Swimming & Diving videos online at ChampionshipProductions.com!

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Discover Entry Position Techniques for Freestyle!

By Kevin Fitzpatrick - Last updated: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Arm action is a huge part of what separates good swimmers from great ones. Ian Pope, Melbourne Vicentre Swimming Club head coach and Olympic team coach for Australia, shows you how he instructs swimmers to position their arms and shoulders for the sprint and distance freestyle strokes.

Entry Position

Drill Summary: In the sprint freestyle, the hands should enter directly in front of the shoulders with a slight angle in the wrist to promote a deeper catch. In the distance freestyle, the hand entry is closer to the surface so the swimmer can extend out in front. Always keep the hand relaxed on entry and open up the fingers to catch the water. As for the shoulder position, focus on keeping shoulders close to the water on entry and avoid over-rotating as dipping the shoulders too much can create drag.

This video came from Championship Productions’ video “Ian Pope’s Swimming Down Under: Freestyle.” Browse through other Swimming & Diving videos online at ChampionshipProductions.com!

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Finish the Freestyle Stroke with Speed!

By Kevin Fitzpatrick - Last updated: Monday, February 1, 2016

University of Georgia head men’s and women’s swimming coach, Jack Bauerle, is one of the best in the business at teaching the freestyle. The “Push Drill” works on finishing the stroke with a high elbow, which will allow for an easy recovery to increase speed and eliminate resistance.

Push Drill

Drill Summary: The goal of the Push Drill is to finish the stroke with speed and work on keeping the elbow high (not straight) and relaxed on the recovery. You can choose to isolate each arm in this drill by doing them once at a time, or swim using a regular freestyle stroke. Start swimming and work on pushing water out the back side of the stroke. Coach Bauerle recommends doing six reps with one arm, then six with the other, or eight-eight, before moving on to a regular freestyle.

This video came from Championship Productions’ video “Start to Finish Freestyle.” Browse through other Swimming & Diving videos online at ChampionshipProductions.com!

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Help Swimmers Create Water Flow!

By Kevin Fitzpatrick - Last updated: Tuesday, December 1, 2015

An effective way to improve your swimmers’ posture and balance is to tow them along and allow them to feel how the water moves across their bodies. Matt Kredich, University of Tennessee head swimming and diving coach, shows you how towing can speed up an athlete’s freestyle stroke.

Assisted Towing

Drill Summary: Strap a cord around the waist of the swimmer and have them get in the water with a board underneath their belly. Begin by having the swimmer extend their arms and legs out and hold that position as the coach walks along the side of the pool and pulls them forward. The swimmer works on sensing the flow of the water over the skin of their body. After a few reps, transition into the swimmer doing a slow freestyle stroke with the aid of the board to feel the water moving against their skin as they complete their stroke.

This video came from Championship Productions’ video “Freestyle Reimagined.” Browse through other Swimming & Diving videos online at ChampionshipProductions.com!

Interested in receiving a FREE swimming newsletter? Sign up today to get tips, technique and drills similar to the post above!




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