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Archive for 'Lacrosse' Category

The latest Lacrosse DVDs features Kevin Donahue and John Desko!

By nate.landas - Last updated: Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Our newest Lacrosse DVDs feature Syracuse University Head Coach, John Desko, and Assistant Coach, Kevin Donahue.  Coach Desko is a 5x National Championship Coach and fifth on the on all-time list for career winning percentage.  Also, Coach Donahue won the 2001 Jay Gallagher Award as the nation’s top Division I assistant coach.  The titles of these Lacrosse DVDs are:

All Access Syracuse Lacrosse Practice

  • Get a behind the scenes look at the most successful Men’s lacrosse program
  • Learn situational station drills for feeding, shooting, transitional play, defense and face-offs
  • Increase your players stick handling and confidence
  • Replace traditional line drills with game-like passing drills players will need to make in the offense
  • Learn pressure and stress drills to get players to work “smarter” on the fly
  • See the Syracuse’s approach to the zone offense and defense

The Encyclopedia of Faceoffs

  • Everything you need to mold dominant faceoff men–even if you’ve never taken a draw yourself
  • Learn the key attributes required to be successful at the face-off X
  • Learn the individual moves used by effective face-off players, and the advantages and disadvantages of each
  • Win more games by getting more possessions per game

Looking for more high quality Lacrosse instruction? Then check out the DVD titles below:

Building a Championship Goalie
The Syracuse Way: Building a Championship Lacrosse Program




Offseason Workout: 4 Weight Room Exercises for the Fourth Quarter Lacrosse Player

By adam.warner - Last updated: Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Professional fitness trainer Greg Howard has designed a proven training program aimed at conditioning athletes to be above game shape. “Fourth quarter” athletes control the tempo of the game and the game doesn’t control them. Come crunch time, they’re a step ahead of the competition and still playing at the top of their game.

In this week’s player development feature, Howard heads to the weight room to reveal several key weight training exercises to build strength and endurance. By supersetting workouts, athletes can really build their explosiveness and get in some great cardio as well.

Also, check out our previous fourth quarter athlete workouts highlighting multiple indoor and outdoor exercises perfect for offseason training.

Squats & Box Jumps

In our weight training series this week, we’re working specifically on supersetting our reps. In other words, go from one exercise directly to another and continue on with your workout.

Let’s start out with squats. While some trainers prefer three sets, aim for four. Start with 15 straight squats. Keep your head up and maintain good form. Don’t bend the back.

After racking that squat weight, you will move right into 15 reps with box jumps. With this exercise, you’ll be jumping up and down from a stool or chair. Maintain good form and make it easy coming off and on. Explode up and get to the top of the platform.

When finished, take a few deep breaths and go right back into your second round of squats. Drop it down to 10 reps this time. This is where your legs begin to feel fatigued and you need to push through. Now with the new round of box jumps, you will really feel fatigued. You must work hard at it. Go for 10 reps here. You can then finish with 8 and 5 reps before moving on.

When combined, you’re getting a 100 percent leg workout, increasing your explosiveness, and getting in a cardio workout by supersetting them together. These workouts really improve that first explosive step.

 

Shoulder Press & Dumbbell Front Press

For the shoulder press and dumbbell front press combined, we like to go four sets total. Start with 10 shoulder press reps and then move into 20 dumbbell front presses. On the should press, make sure the bar gets no lower than the chin. Work on developing the front deltoids. Keep a strong back and your core tight.

Next, go right into a stationary front press. One arm at a time, press the dumbbells high into the air. When finished with your set, go right back into the shoulder press after a 5-10 second breather. Aim for another 10 reps on the second time. Shoot for 20-25 seconds of rest and be sure to keep up your breathing techniques learned from our first outdoor exercise feature.

 

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “Training the Fourth Quarter Athlete” with Greg Howard. To check out additional training and performance enhancement videos, click here.




2 Highly-Effective Game Speed Drills for Productive Lacrosse Practices

By adam.warner - Last updated: Tuesday, June 12, 2012

In this week’s skill development feature, we reveal a pair of game speed drills that replicate game situations and are ideal for efficient and production practices. Watch as Stevens head coach Gene Peluso and assistant coach Matt Madalon break down each drill using whiteboard diagrams before heading out to the field for live simulations.

4 Cone, 3 Man Drill

Overview: This first drill is a high energy anticipation ball movement drill used during offensive position work. The drill teaches players how to transfer the ball effectively, focus on ball protection, put the ball into the right spots, and moving the ball efficiently and effectively within offensive sets.

Rules: Break up the team into groups of three players. Each group should have four cones and 3-5 balls. Cones are set up in a box (10 to 12 yards apart). The drill runs in intervals of 30-45 seconds at full speed. The players must remain outside the cones at all times.

The Action: You’ll have players at three of the four cones. At the whistle, the first player with the ball passes to his adjacent teammate (up top left). As soon as he transfers the ball, he will get right to the open cone. The player now with the ball turns to the outside and then passes it to the next adjacent player (or top right). As this next player receives the ball (with his right hand), that previous player will sprint to the open cone. And hopefully, we get a continuous flow out of this drill. Get crisp passes and work hard before a 15 second break. The timing of cuts and receiving/passing the ball is crucial here.

Coaches can really tweak this drill. For instance, you can focus on strong or weak hands, rolling to the outside, same-hand transfers, and much more. Also, be sure that players are working on giving good targets, talking, and moving, timing cuts efficiently, and not standing around.

 

On the Field

As you can see, the drill starts slow but eventually builds up and ends up going quite fast. Players, make quick turns when you turn to the outside. Also, remember that communication is key to this drill and get constant movement. You shouldn’t ever be standing around. Explode to that open space.

In case of loose balls, be sure to reload with extra balls nearby. This drill really transfer over to 6-on-6 offensive sets as the players can get comfortable in this format getting the ball in and out of their sticks and playing together.

 

Six Line Shooting Drill

This is a terrific drill to get the entire team a ton of touches. Set up four lines of midfielders (1 through 4) in front of the cage and two lines of attackmen behind. Midfielders 1 and 2 are up near the restraining box. Meanwhile, 3 and 4 are about 10 yards up and close to the alley lines on the sides of the field. The attackers are close to the endline but a few yards away.

After the ball gets up the field and to the attackers, they will immediately scissor/crisscross behind and then look for the middies, who are looking to receive the ball and get a quick release on an 8-10 yard shot. After the attackers make that pass, they’re going to finish their cut up field, and A1 will receive a pass from M3 and A2 will receive a pass from M4. After a shot or pass, A1 and A2 switch sides and M1 and M2 switch sides and go to the cage. We are looking for quick releases and accuracy with each shot.

 

On the Field

Run this drill for 10-15 minutes and your players will get 30-40 shots each. It’s great for stick handling, ball movement, and finishing in tight. It can also act as conditioning drill if you split up your team and run this at opposite ends of the field.

 

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “Game Speed Drills for Creating Game Like Practices.” To check out similar drills, head over to our video library




All Access Northwestern Lacrosse: Stickwork, Dodging, and Cone Drills

By adam.warner - Last updated: Tuesday, June 12, 2012

In this week’s edition of All Access, we take you to Evanston, Illinois for a behind-the-scenes look at a Northwestern University women’s lacrosse practice. Follow along as head coach Kelly Amonte Hiller leads her squad through typical warm-ups and station drills designed to get a ton of repetitions and create game-like situations.

Thanks to an 8-6 come-from-behind win over Syracuse on May 27, the Wildcats won the 2012 NCAA Division I women’s national championship. The victory handed Northwestern its seventh championship in the last eight years. The program has tallied seven overall championships – which ranks second all-time. Maryland won 10 titles between 1986 and 2010.

Stickwork Line Passing

With line passing, there are several stationary feeders lined up and spread out. Meanwhile, there’s a group of moving passers. These passers are continuously moving down the line, passing to each feeder and getting the pass back before moving on.

There’s constant movement and communication happening at all times. Each passer should call out the name of the appropriate receiver and hit them with a crisp pass. Players should always stay low with their shuffling and remain in good athletic positions.

Next, the players implement a one-handed catch, switch, and throw back with the other hand. At the sound of the whistle, players should work their way back the other direction and be sure to switch the hand they catch and throw with. This drill really works on strengthening your off hand.

 

3-Cone Drill with Feeds

In this three-cone drill, players will start out at the GLE and eventually get two feeds. Only two players (a shooter and passer) are working with each other at a time. The shooter will come around a cone set out about 7 yards in front of the goal. The passer must look to pass the ball nice and early. Shooters should receive the pass right when they reach the cone in order to make the turn, open up the body, and put the entire body into the shot.

After the shot, that same player will go around another cone set out about 11 yards (and slightly left of the cage) and catch and shoot. Once the shooter gets away two shots, the previous feeder will then turn into the shooter and begin with a lefty shot around the first cone and then finish with another lefty shot, this time after coming around the far right (11-yard) cone. As far as cone set-up, assemble them in a triangle formation starting at 7 yards and moving out to 11 yards on the right and left sides. Tip: Get your whole body into it and try to overemphasize the form.

 

Cross-Cage Shooting with Dodge

In the middle of the field, cones are set up where players should make their dodge move. Often, players will just run by the cone. However, we really want players to make a strong move, drop the shoulders to the inside, really set up the defender, and make that split dodge and get your entire body into it. Get that defender off balance before you accelerate through and go for the pipe.

8M Drill with Sprints

Finally, we finish up with an effective drill that focuses on free position attempts. Get a goalie in the cage. The drill participants on the far right will be sprinting on each free position rep. Meanwhile, we’ll also get two people playing defense (with one low and one at the hash) and one offensive player with possession.

At the whistle, the player with the ball will look to go hard at the cage with two defenders closing out on her. As this happens, the players on the far right work on sprints starting at the sound of the whistle. There’s a constant rotation among the players.

Tip: When you step up to that line, even though you’re tired, know what you’re going to do. You’ve got two legit defenders on you, take that extra second. Know your strategy and make a move.

 

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “All Access Northwestern Lacrosse Practice with Kelly Amonte Hiller.” To check out the latest All Access videos in our lacrosse library, click here




A Must-Have Face-Off Warm-Up Progression for Every Level

By adam.warner - Last updated: Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Tufts head coach Mike Daly is a firm believer that increased face-off work in practice had a direct correlation to his team’s championship run in 2010.

This week you’ll get an exclusive chance to learn Daly’s face-off warm-up progression, an instrumental set of face-off drills that have paid dividends for his squad in recent seasons. Look to incorporate these effective drills in your own practices this year. Hopefully, you’ll see an improvement in your face-off winning percentage and overall transition game.

Face-Off Warm-Up Progression

For Coach Daly and the Jumbos, this warm-up is a key part of their face-off routine. It starts with face-off basics and then moves into counters and more detailed progressions.

First up, after Coach Daly blows the whistle, players get into their face-off positions (squatting and head down), and go back and forth over the top of the ball with their stick head for up to 10 seconds. Take a short break and then the players repeat.

Next, it’s Moves vs. Air, which includes clamps, jams, and lasers. It all starts with a clamp move after the whistle. Then the players practice Jams vs. Air. This is where each face-off guy reaches out across the ball and jams his stick to prevent his opponent from getting to the ball. He can then easily funnel the ball in his direction thanks to key body positioning and effective stick placement. For Lasers vs. Air, there’s an immediate deflection of the ball with the stick and the player can play the ball to space.

 

For Dummy Partner, players are simply working on their moves against each other. The dummies provide some resistance and the goal is to get warmed up and go against some minimal resistance.

Finally, the players go live against each other. Competition is important here. If you win, you move up to the winner’s side. If you lose you go back to the loser’s side. You keep moving guys up until you have an ultimate winner. Overall, it’s great competition and something that the Tufts lacrosse team uses in practice and even on game day. It also incorporates toughness into every one of their reps.

 

Got any other face-off drills that you use in your own warm-up progression? E-mail us at info@championshipproductions.com and tell us why they are so effective for you.

The previous clips can be seen on Championship Productions’ DVD “Lacrosse Face-Offs: Winning Every Draw.” To check out more face-off videos, head over to our video library




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